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News Alert
Obama Stops by Canter's for Lunch

Report: Students in Charter Schools Learn More than LAUSD Counterparts

Experts say the results for Hispanic students in charter schools are particularly noteworthy.

Palisades Charter High School is an independent charter school in Los Angeles Unifed School District.
Palisades Charter High School is an independent charter school in Los Angeles Unifed School District.

A report released by Stanford University's Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) found that the typical student in a Los Angeles charter school gains more learning in a year than his or her district school peer, amounting to about 50 more days of learning in reading and an additional 79 days of learning in math.

"Results for Hispanic charter students in Los Angeles, especially Hispanic students in poverty, were noteworthy," according to Dev Davis, Research Manager and co-author of the Los Angeles CREDO report. "The gains for Hispanic students in poverty at charters amount to 58 additional days of learning in reading and 115 more days in math compared to their district school counterparts," Davis said.

The 2014 Los Angeles Report found that citywide, compared to traditional school alternatives, 48 percent of charter schools have significantly larger learning gains in reading, while 44 percent do so in math. Thirteen percent of charter schools have results that are significantly worse than their district school peers in reading, and 22 percent perform worse in math. Nationally 25 percent of charter schools have significantly larger learning gains in reading, while 29 percent do so in math. Nineteen percent of charter schools have results that are significantly worse than their district school peers in reading, and 31 percent do so in math.

"We are very pleased with the results of the study released by CREDO at Stanford University," said John Deasy, Superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. "Today's study is another indicator of the amazing results our students, educators and parents are accomplishing in Los Angeles. The students in both District and charter schools in Los Angeles are achieving at the highest levels in the history of the city," he said.

On the National Assessment of Educational Progress, according to Deasy, LAUSD fourth graders since 2011 had the second-highest overall gain in reading of all 21 urban districts. African-American and white students in fourth grade had the highest gains in reading compared to any other urban districts nationally, and LAUSD had the highest gains in reading scores for eighth graders compared to other districts over the past 10 years, according to Deasy.

"We are excited and further motivated by what the CREDO study highlights as a result of the tremendous work of our students, our charter school partners, our Board of Education and entire District team," Jose Cole- Gutierrez, Director of LAUSD's Charter School Division, said. "LAUSD remains committed to serving with excellence as an authorizer and working in collaboration with our partners so that we learn from one another, ensure quality, and help all students maximize their potential."

--City News Service

M.r. Passan March 16, 2014 at 11:41 PM
I teach at PCHS. I have 42 in my class Neal.
Don March 17, 2014 at 10:00 AM
Since its apparent after decades of inept indifference by LAUSD and the Teachers unions, what are the citizens of Los Angeles going to do about it? Continue apathy or demand with whatever measures necessary inmasse to say enough is enough. How about vouchers to start?
Ken Smith March 20, 2014 at 03:13 PM
I read throught the actual research and the reporter only highlighted the positive. One of the important pieces of information was that the study stated that 30% of charters in LA will perform below standard in math and 1/4 below standard in English. They also did not list the average demographic for the schools which I found significant and stated earlier. out of about 150,000 students, there are under 6,000 special education students. That is less than 4%. At my campus we have 22% special education and those numbers highly impact our performance and test scores. Again, charters had a higher number of whites which typically have higher test scores, a much lower number of latino students who historically do not score as high as whites or asians, and a lower number of students in poverty. I think it is clear how charters are making the advances in testing. They are getting students that 1. Have family support. 2. Want to succeed so they are making choices to improve. 3. There are less students with challenges like poverty, special needs and behavior.

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